Eaten BY a dinosaur or eating IN a dinosaur? First = Bad, Second = good

Illustration of a New Year's Eve dinner inside an iguana

A lovely illustration of a famous New Year’s Eve dinner inside a iguanadon (1853). Present were paleontologist, R. Owen, paleoartist B.W. Hawkins – and various scientists and newspaper editors.

And here are my only two dinosaur jokes:

What do you call a short-sighted dinosaur? “Do-you-think-he-saw-us”
What do you call a short-sighted dinosaur’s dog? “Do-you-think-he-saw-us-Rex”

[Deafening silence, I’ll get my coat]

A duel between nuns, Illustrated Police News, 1869

A duel between nuns from the Illustrated Police News (1869).

‘A duel between nuns’ from the Illustrated Police News (1869). Not something you read every day! The full title: is ‘A duel between nuns within their convent near Genoa [Italy] according to the information of the time, no blood was poured’.

The Illustrated Police News was founded in 1864 – it was a popular British magazine full of lurid stories and produced famously sensational stories during the Jack the Ripper murders of 1888. It ceased publication in 1938.

 

A dandy’s toilette (1818) – perhaps the famous “Beau” Brummel

A dandy’s toilette (1818)

A dandy’s toilette (1818). A colour engraving, alas the artist is unknown. Used in the book: The corset, A cultural history by Valerie Steele.

The dandy, might be George “Beau” Brummel (1778-1840), an iconic figure in Regency England and an arbiter of men’s fashion. He was a friend of the Prince Regent, the future King George IV.

The Comb of Pearl (1897) as illustrated by James Carter Beard (USA)

The Comb of Pearl (1897) as illustrated by James Carter Beard

The Comb of Pearl –  from the book The Hall of Shells, written by Mrs. A. S. Hardy (pub. 1897). Illustrated by James Carter Beard (US, 1837-1938).

Beard (1850-1941) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA) into a family of artists. As a youth, he explored the woods and made sketches of nature. He illustrated a number of books for Mark Twain – and many others.

 

A griffin having a snack, probably created in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England (1200s)

A griffin - half eagle and half lion, probably created in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England - 1200s

A griffin – half eagle and half lion, carrying its prey in its claws. The image is taken from a Bestiary*. This manuscript was originally produced in England, probably in Salisbury, Wiltshire in the thirteenth century (1200s).

*To save you looking up “Bestiary” – it is a descriptive or anecdotal treatise on various kinds of animal, popular in the medieval period – and often having a moralising tone.

[Acknowledgement: British Library.]