Freedom of Worship (1943) by Norman Rockwell

Freedom of Worship (1943) by Norman Rockwell

Freedom of Worship (1943) by Norman Rockwell (1894-1978). American author, painter &  illustrator.

There is a Norman Rockwell Museum you can visit, if you happen to be passing through Massachusetts.

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Glendale Road / Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262
413-298-4100

 

 

 

Father William from Alice in Wonderland (1907) as illus. by artist, Thomas Maybank

Father William from Alice in Wonderland (1907) as illus. by Thomas Maybank (1869-1929)_800

You Are Old, Father William from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland (1907) – as illustrated by artist, Thomas Maybank (1869-1929).

“You are old, Father William,” the young man said,
“And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head—
Do you think, at your age, it is right?”

“In my youth,” Father William replied to his son,
“I feared it might injure the brain;
But now that I’m perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again.”

“You are old,” said the youth, “As I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door—
Pray, what is the reason of that?”

“In my youth,” said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
“I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment—one shilling a box—
Allow me to sell you a couple?”

“You are old,” said the youth, “And your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak—
Pray, how did you manage to do it?”

“In my youth,” said his father, “I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.”

“You are old,” said the youth, “one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose—
What made you so awfully clever?”

“I have answered three questions, and that is enough,”
Said his father; “don’t give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I’ll kick you down stairs!”

Remarkable design by talented artist, Aubrey Beardsley (1894)

Remarkable design by talented artist, Aubrey Beardsley (1894)

Design by talented artist, Aubrey Beardsley. This is title page illustration for the Yellow Book, vol. 2, London, Boston (1894).

Beardsley’s drawings often in black ink were influenced by the style of Japanese woodcuts and emphasised the grotesque, the decadent, and the erotic. The artist died of Tuberculosis (tb), aged 25.

An idealised depiction of the Champ d’Asile, a short-lived settlement founded in Texas (1818)

An idealised depiction of the Champ d’Asile by artist, Joseph Claude Pomel (1823).

An idealised depiction of the Champ d’Asile by artist, Joseph Claude Pomel (1823).

Champ d’Asile (“Field of Asylum”) was a short-lived settlement founded in Texas, USA in January 1818, by 20 French Bonapartist veterans of the Napoleonic Wars from the Vine and Olive Colony. The party was led by General Charles Lallemand. Land was offered to French settlers on March 3, 1817, after a vote by the United States Congress. Champ d’Asile was situated along the Trinity River and was abandoned in July of the same year.

Little Molly goes shopping, from The Rainbow Annual (1928)

Illustration from The Rainbow Annual (1928)

Little Molly goes shopping. An Illustration from The Rainbow Annual (1928). A British annual for children.

Molly must be completely absorbed in her copy of Rainbow, because the illustration shows a policeman inspecting the items that have fallen from the deeply engrossed child’s basket. Now, I suppose, it would be a mobile phone that distracted her, so ’twas ever thus.

P.S. You may have heard that British policeman are sometimes called “bobbies”,but probably don’t know why. The name derives from the UK Home Secretary, Sir Robert (Bob) Peel [1778-1850], who oversaw the creation of London’s first organised police force.

Scary illustration by Émile Bayard for Histoire de la magie (1870)

Scary illustration by Émile Bayard for Histoire de la magie (1870)

Illustration by Émile Bayard (1837-1891) for Paul Christian’s Histoire de la magie (1870).

Jean-Baptiste Pitois, aka, Paul Christian (1811-1877), was a French author, known for The History and Practice of Magic. He was raised in a monastic community, but eventually decided against the priesthood. As a young man, he moved to Paris, where he became the associate of Charles Nodier, acquiring Nodier’s interest in the occult.