An illustration by John R. Neill (1877-1943) for Treasure Island

An illustration by John R. Neill (1877-1943) from Treasure Island

A wonderful illustration by John R. Neill (1877-1943) for Treasure Island. Neill was a magazine and children’s book illustrator, mostly known for his ‘Land of Oz’ series (remember The Wonderful Wizard of Oz?).

Treasure Island is a classic adventure novel by Scottish author, Robert Louis Stevenson. It was first published in 1881, but set in the mid 1700s (a few decades before the setting of Winston Graham’s Poldark novels). It’s one of those books that used to be described as a ‘thumping good yarn’ – now publishers would probably call it ‘an engaging page-turner’.

Adventure on the high seas and a quest for pirate treasure, with colourful characters in an exotic setting. What more could you ask for?

 

 

 

An illustration (1916) by Frank C. Papé from The Russian Story Book

Illustration (1916) by Frank C. Papé (1878-1972) from The Russian Story Book

An extraordinary illustration (1916) by Frank C. Papé (1878-1972) from The Russian Story Book [author, Richard Wilson]

A book that might be classified under the fairy tale/folklore heading. I won’t try and guess exactly what is going on – but those birds look hungry.

Some of the books that had a heavy contribution from Frank Papé.

  • The Gateway to Spenser – Stories from the Faërie Queen (1910);
  • The Pilgrim’s Progress (1910);
  • The Golden Fairy Book (1911);
  • The Ruby Fairy Book (1911);
  • The Diamond Fairy Book (1911);
  • Sigurd and Gudrun (1912);
  • Siegfried and Kriemhild (1912);
  • The Book of Psalms (1912);
  • As It Is In Heaven (1912);
  • The Story Without an End (1913);
  • Robin Hood and Other Stories of Yorkshire (1915); and
  • The Russian Story Book (1916).

The spirit told Joseph that he must take the Grail to a distant country, called West-Over-The-Sea … and on to Glastonbury

Illustration from Stories Of King Arthur [Retold by Blanche Winder1968

Taken from Stories Of King Arthur [Retold by Blanche Winder, 1968]. Illustration by Harry G. Theaker.

One day as he worked in his garden, Joseph of Arimathea was visited by a beautiful Spirit, who told him he must take the Holy Grail to a distant country, called West-Over-The-Sea, (Britain) to a place called Glastonbury.

The Evening (1899) by Charles Dana Gibson

Illustration of The Evening (1899) by Charles Dana Gibson

The Evening (1899) by Charles Dana Gibson (1867-1954).

But who is the shadowy male figure? Any ideas? I think it is her deceased husband, he seems to be dressed in clothes from an earlier period. It is The Evening of her life and soon they will be reunited. Only my guess though.