Sailing to the moon (1868); an Ancient Greek idea

A Voyage to the Moon (1868) by Gustave Doré

Jules Verne and H.G. Wells are often said to be the fathers of science fiction – and Mary Shelley the mother. Verne was more interested in scientific theories and technical details, whereas Wells and Shelley were less bothered about such specifics.

So much for 1800s, in fact you can go back a lot further to find early tales that could be considered as sci-fi.

‘A True Story’ is a novel written in the 2nd century by Lucian of Samosata (a Greek-speaking author of Syrian origin). It is the earliest known work of fiction to include travel to outer space, alien life-forms, and interplanetary warfare. Lucian develops the Greek notion that the moon is a mirror world to our own. Setting out on a voyage, the story-teller is caught up in a storm that propels him through the sky, and his ship ends up landing on the moon.

The wonderful illustration shown here is ‘A Voyage to the Moon’ (1868) by Gustave Doré (France, 1832-1883).

Some favourite moon and space quotes:

“There is nothing new under the sun, but there are new suns.”
― Octavia E. Butler

“I had aimed at Mars and was about to hit Venus; unquestionably the all-time cosmic record for poor shots.”
― Edgar Rice Burroughs, Pirates of Venus

“Everyone is a moon, and has a dark side which he never shows to anybody.”
― Mark Twain

“We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.
― John F. Kennedy

“As different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.”
― Emily Brontë

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s